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Posted by: John Brace | 5th February 2017

What’s in a ~500 page contract between the Police and Crime Commissioner for Merseyside and CRG for a private company to provide detained persons and officers healthcare and medical services?

What’s in a ~500 page contract between the Police and Crime Commissioner for Merseyside and CRG for a private company to provide detained persons and officers healthcare and medical services?

                                

I have a big red box file in my office.

What’s in the box you may ask?

Here’s a sample.

letter Police Crime Commissioner for Merseyside citizen audit 2015-16 page 1 of 2

letter Police Crime Commissioner for Merseyside citizen audit 2015-16 page 1 of 2

letter Police Crime Commissioner for Merseyside citizen audit 2015-16 page 2 of 2

letter Police Crime Commissioner for Merseyside citizen audit 2015-16 page 2 of 2

Well it’s the result of my citizen audit of the Police and Crime Commissioner for Merseyside for the financial year 2015-16.

Just to show how long I’ve been a journalist for, you will find on this blog reports of public meetings of the Merseyside Police Authority. A few years ago the coalition government abolished the Merseyside Police Authority and replaced it with the Office of the Police and Crime Commissioner for Merseyside.

In the box are copies of 49 invoices and details of 10 contracts.

The largest contract at ~500 pages is a contract between the Police and Crime Commissioner and Castlerock Recruitment Group LTD t/a CRG for the “Provision of Forensic Medical and Healthcare Services for the period, 21st January 2015 – 20th January 2017 with an option to extend by a further 2 years.“ which is reference PCCM / PD / 026 – Bluelight ref. 9KBD-BXVLMV .

This is perhaps the most interesting document although like many of the documents is redacted in part.

There’s also a service level agreement with Knowsley Metropolitan Borough Council and a secondment agreement with Liverpool City Council.

Some of the redactions were later challenged by myself and the Office of the Police and Crime Commissioner agreed with me that they didn’t have a legal basis to do so and released further information.

It is somewhat strange however that myself a journalist seems to have a better knowledge (from a legal perspective) over what can be redacted than the Office of the Police and Crime Commissioner. However I shouldn’t be too harsh on the OPCC for Merseyside as legal advice is a matter contracted under a SLA out to Knowsley Council (but don’t get me started on Knowsley Council and flawed legal advice!)

However the public sector as a whole has a tendency to for want of an expression take the mickey with me over redactions.

Although thankfully I rarely have to involve the judiciary in such matters.

Anyway going back to the large contract, due to its size from a time element it would take some considerable time to scan in, resize, compress and publish on the blog.

Those of a more political bent, may point out that in the public sector paying a private company for medical and healthcare services, that this falls into the political arguments over whether public services should be provided by the public sector. If provided by the private sector, ultimately less is spent on the service as a proportion ends up in profit (and presumably a different amount in taxes). For example 20% of all the money spent on CRG goes on VAT.

However, from CRG‘s last published accounts for 2015-16, they have a turnover of £34.3 million with a gross profit of 23.1%.

So out of £100 spent by the public sector with CRG, I estimate £16.69 will go on VAT, £23.10 on profit, leaving ~£60 out of every £100 on providing a service.

The contract is signed by Jane Kennedy (the Police and Crime Commissioner for Merseyside) and Laura Hale (a director of Castlerock Recruitment Group Limited).

Moving on to the Pre-Qualification Questionnaire it states that it’s for the provision of forensic and healthcare services (excluding SARCS).

SARC refers to Sexual Assault Referral Centre.

It explains that police forces and NHS Local Area Teams are working towards the transfer of commissioning responsibility for healthcare in police custody from the Home Office to the Department of Health and that the work of these Police/NHS Partnerships sits within the National Police Transition Programme.

If this happens during the life of the contract it is anticipated that the commissioning authority changes from Merseyside Police to the NHS England Lancashire Area Team and the contract will be novated.

However police forces and the NHS share contract governance, even after this change. This is done through the Strategic Healthcare Joint Partnership Board, at the time chaired by Chief Superintendant Carl Krueger, with representatives from NHS England Lancashire Area Team and NHS England (Merseyside).

PCC in the contract refers to the Police and Crime Commissioner for Merseyside.

The background explains that Merseyside Police was formed in 1974, serves a population of ~1.5 million people, covering an area of 647 sq km and five Metropolitan Borough Areas (Liverpool, Sefton, Knowsley, St Helens and Wirral).

It then describes the BCUs (Basic Command Units) in operation at the time, which was one for each borough except Liverpool split into two.

The contract refers to the three universities, two premiership football teams (Tranmere Rovers doesn’t get a mention or maybe its fans are better behaved), a rugby league team and two major racecourses. It states that in 2013, Liverpool received 57 million visitors to the region (referring to tourism). At the time of writing Merseyside Police employed over 6,000 people (*although technically police officers aren’t employees but officers of the Crown) ranging from police officers, PCSOs, support staff, Special Constabulary Officers and volunteers).

The custody suites are listed as follows (five in total) with 131 cells. There are also two mothballed custody suites which can be opened for pre-planned events and operations (which is an extra 32 cells).

Here is the list in the following format
location – BCU – Cells – Current operation

St Anne Street – Liverpool – 33 – 24/7
Wavertree – Liverpool – 20 – 24/7
Copy Lane – Sefton – 24 – 24/7
Wirral – 32 – 24/7
St Helens – 22 – 24/7 (Mothballing or reduced opening hours are currently being considered for this suite)
Southport – 12 – Mothballed
Belle Vale – South Liverpool – Mothballed

The contract states that services at the time of the contract award were provided by Medacs Healthcare (contact details Helen Kelly (Director of Managed Healthcare)) and that staff employed by Medacs may need to be TUPEd over to the new provider.

There is a list of how many detainees there are for each month from April 2013-14, how many calls there were for a healthcare professional, along with a percentage of HCP calls vs No of detainees.

The total number of detainees varies from 3,510 in April to 3,927 in July. The number of HCP calls varies from 1,698 in March to 2,217 in July. The percentage varies from 46.3% in March to 56.5% in July.

There is then a table for December 2013 of various categories of call out, split by custody suite location with totals.

For example one of the categories, category 6 is Death (All) of which there were 4 in December 2013. This is 4 out of a total of 2,011 calls for a healthcare professional.

The six major categories (all with totals over 100 call outs in that month across Merseyside) in order of calls were:

Injuries (All) – inc Officer Injury,
Fitness to – Detain, Interview, Release, Court, Travel etc,
Medication Administer / Review,
Drink / Drug Withdrawl,
Reassessment / Mental Health Reassessment,
Detainee’s Request / Complaint against police

There were also 27 listed as Taser Removal / self harm / suicide risk.

Below are the first pages of the contract that I’m referring to. Are people interested in the rest or is police officer healthcare and detained persons’ healthcare an issue you assumed was provided by the NHS?

Just to be clear, these pages are published relating to rights in the Re-Use of Public Sector Information Regulations 2015, Accounts and Audit Regulations 2015, Data Protection Act 1998 and Local Audit and Accountability Act 2014.

contract Police and Crime Commissioner for Merseyside and Castlerock Recruitment Group LTD t a CRG 1

contract Police and Crime Commissioner for Merseyside and Castlerock Recruitment Group LTD t a CRG 1

contract Police and Crime Commissioner for Merseyside and Castlerock Recruitment Group LTD t a CRG 2

contract Police and Crime Commissioner for Merseyside and Castlerock Recruitment Group LTD t a CRG 2

contract Police and Crime Commissioner for Merseyside and Castlerock Recruitment Group LTD t a CRG 3

contract Police and Crime Commissioner for Merseyside and Castlerock Recruitment Group LTD t a CRG 3

contract Police and Crime Commissioner for Merseyside and Castlerock Recruitment Group LTD t a CRG 4

contract Police and Crime Commissioner for Merseyside and Castlerock Recruitment Group LTD t a CRG 4

contract Police and Crime Commissioner for Merseyside and Castlerock Recruitment Group LTD t a CRG 5

contract Police and Crime Commissioner for Merseyside and Castlerock Recruitment Group LTD t a CRG 5

contract Police and Crime Commissioner for Merseyside and Castlerock Recruitment Group LTD t a CRG 6

contract Police and Crime Commissioner for Merseyside and Castlerock Recruitment Group LTD t a CRG 6

contract Police and Crime Commissioner for Merseyside and Castlerock Recruitment Group LTD t a CRG 7

contract Police and Crime Commissioner for Merseyside and Castlerock Recruitment Group LTD t a CRG 7

contract Police and Crime Commissioner for Merseyside and Castlerock Recruitment Group LTD t a CRG 8

contract Police and Crime Commissioner for Merseyside and Castlerock Recruitment Group LTD t a CRG 8

contract Police and Crime Commissioner for Merseyside and Castlerock Recruitment Group LTD t a CRG 9

contract Police and Crime Commissioner for Merseyside and Castlerock Recruitment Group LTD t a CRG 9

contract Police and Crime Commissioner for Merseyside and Castlerock Recruitment Group LTD t a CRG 10

contract Police and Crime Commissioner for Merseyside and Castlerock Recruitment Group LTD t a CRG 10

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Responses

  1. I can understand why Forensics are contracted out to privately funded specialist suppliers but why Medical Services?

    What is wrong with NHS for public servants and Officers of The crown?

    • By the looks of the tables I’ve published above, the forensics side is a relatively small part of the contract and seems to be mainly matters such as blood tests for those involved in a road traffic accident (presumably to test for alcohol levels and/or drugs) and a small amount of DNA tests where there’s an allegation of a sexual offence.

      As to why healthcare for officers in the custody suites and detained persons isn’t provided by the NHS (although the NHS has some oversight and governance of the contract) is a question better addressed to the Office of the Police and Crime Commissioner for Merseyside?

  2. G’day John

    Another week of laughing at them over Kev and Stella’s Stinking Stagnant wirral Waters.

    Ooroo

    James

    See if you can get over….. 3rd floor or just smell out the rats.

    • I’ve been blowing the whistle myself on how Wirral Council runs elections. I did so yesterday.

      As someone who’s written about blowing the whistle, I could get as jaded and cynical about such processes as you!

      I blew the whistle to Eric Robinson (Returning Officer), Surjit Tour (Monitoring Officer), the Director of Public Prosecutions Alison Saunders and Wirral Council’s press office.

      Maybe it’ll get referred to Merseyside Police, who I am sure have a bulk buy of “No case to answer” stamps when it comes to Wirral Council (yes that is meant sarcastically)!

      It is however a political hot potato that is now someone elses’ problem to deal with.

      What will come of that I don’t know, but sometimes being press I think writing about matters and publishing it can be quicker, easier and more cost effective than blowing the whistle!

      We discussed going to the final week of this Employment Tribunal at an editorial meeting.

      I wanted to go, but got argued out of it.

      To be honest, from what I’ve heard so far hearing it all first hand would probably not have a good effect on my blood pressure!

      I noticed in commentary on the Employment Tribunal case you refer to, that the (presumably) former employee made a protected disclosure, but the view was that this was done after the employee became aware of what led to the protected disclosure.

      Just to show you I do care about industrial relations and Wirral Council I will refer you to the mentality of Wirral Council. Here is the judgement of the Employment Appeals Tribunal.

      Wirral Council “won” its case at the Employment Tribunal. The person (supported by their union) appealed successfully to the Employment Appeals Tribunal.

      As the appeal was successful Wirral Council was asked to pay the £1,600 appeal fee. £1,600 to an organisation that has control over £billions is basically a drop in the ocean.

      However Wirral Council argued that it shouldn’t have to pay the fee as according to them there was no basis for making a cost order, that the costs of lodging an appeal had been paid by the Claimant’s trade union and that Wirral Council are not unreasonable.

      The ruling was that it didn’t matter whether Wirral Council were unreasonable, that the appeal was successful and stated “It thus seems to us that this is a case where the Claimant is entitled to expect reimbursement of her fees.” and ordered that Wirral Council pay £1,600.

      In the old days of course, Wirral Council did its uttermost to make sure employee matters never made it to the Employment Tribunal or Employment Appeals Tribunal stage.

      There was a former solicitor that used to work for Wirral Council that took it to an Employment Tribunal, then the Employment Appeals Tribunal and then to the Court of Appeal.

      I hate to think what the legal costs incurred by Wirral Council (and the former employee) were of that matter!

  3. “It is somewhat strange however that myself a journalist seems to have a better knowledge (from a legal perspective) over what can be redacted than the Office of the Police and Crime Commissioner. However I shouldn’t be too harsh on the OPCC for Merseyside as legal advice is a matter contracted under a SLA out to Knowsley Council (but don’t get me started on Knowsley Council and flawed legal advice!).”

    Hi John,
    Can you shed any light or point me in the right direction about “Knowsley Council and flawed legal advice” please.
    Do you know when the SLA contract for legal advice was signed? Any chance you have a copy?
    Cheers
    JT

    • Hi,

      Many years ago (months before the legislation on filming public meetings changed) there was the first meeting of the Liverpool City Region Combined Authority.

      As per its constitution I had to make a request to Sheena Ramsey to do so. She was the Chief Executive of Knowsley Council.

      The reply I got back said she was denying the request, basing that on a law that didn’t apply to the Combined Authority.

      After further email correspondence she admitted the error and that that part of her legal position was incorrect.

      At a public meeting of the Merseyside Police and Crime Panel, Knowsley advised the Chair to ban filming. I think that time it was on the Deputy Chief Executive for Knowsley Council’s advice.

      I do have a copy of the SLA, but much of the detail has been redacted (including signatures, rates etc). From memory it was from 2010 under the Merseyside Police Authority.

      I’ve checked my paper copy of the SLA, unfortunately only the year it was started (2010) is visible, the rest of the date was either redacted or not present on the original.


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